//
you're reading...

Subtitling

How to make “blah-blah-blah” mean something

A Midsummer's Okinawan Dream

A Midsummer's Okinawan Dream 真夏の夜の夢

In 2008, I subtitled a film called A Midsummer’s Okinawan Dream. As the title suggests, it’s an adaptation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream set in modern day Okinawa, directed by Yuji Nakae (Hotel Hibiscus). The film presented me with arguably the most difficult subtitle I’ve ever had to write.

The film opens with Okinawan fairies called Kijimun singing of the history of this particular island, starting with the days of the Ryukyu Kingdom and how they had long guarded the island and its human inhabitants. They do so in an archaic Ryukyu language that is incomprehensible to today’s Japanese; hence, the Japanese release features Japanese subtitles for these sections. Though I typically avoid using “Fakespeare” in my subtitles, I felt that this was one instance when using Shakespearean language would be appropriate. It would convey the archaic nature of the language spoken while also referencing the original text from which the film is adapted. To pull this off, I re-read some Shakespeare and studied the unique syntax in his style. This, though, wasn’t the hard part.

Towards the end of this song, an elderly Kijimun sings, “nani ga nanishite nantoyara.” In Japanese, this sounds more or less like “blah-blah-blah,” and loosely translates to “this and that happened.” The producer wrote a helpful footnote explaining what this is referring to: “The Ryukyu Kingdom eventually collapsed and was conquered by Japan before becoming a battleground during World War II, after which it was occupied by the U.S. and then eventually returned to Japanese rule. This history of transition is what’s being referred to here.” Great.

So how should one take “blah-blah-blah” and make it refer to anything close to what the producer explained?

First, I skipped this section and subtitled the rest of the film. I then came back and spent half a day mulling it over. What I eventually came up with is the following:

What tempest brought
By turbulent tides!

What I tried to do is evoke the tumultuous history of the island being invaded by outside forces without spelling out the actual historical events. I did this with imagery, in this case the metaphor of stormy waves crashing onto its shores. I was also glad to have been able to use alliteration, mimicking the na alliteration in the original. Finally, I managed to work in a reference to another Shakespeare title.

To this day, no single subtitle has given me as much fits as this one did. In the end, though, it taught me something valuable. Creative subtitles can often use imagery to evoke that which is difficult or impossible to do with a more literal translation. Whenever I run into problematic dialogue that seems impossible to subtitle, I try to think back to this half-day battle and remember the lesson learned.

 

「ナニガナニシテナントヤラ」

2008年に、『真夏の夜の夢』という作品の英語字幕を手がけました。『ホテルハイビスカス』の中江裕司監督による、シェイクスピアの原作を現代の沖縄を舞台に翻案したものでした。今まで携わってきた作品の中でも、一枚の字幕でこれほど悩んだ作品はありませんでした。

作品の冒頭では、キジムンという精霊がこの沖縄の某島の歴史を歌い、琉球王国時代からその島と住民たちを見守ってきたことなどを語ります。これが現代の日本人には全く理解不可能な琉球語で歌われ、日本国内版では日本語字幕が付きます。通常私は字幕においてはシェイクスピアっぽい「フェイクスピア」は使わないようにしていますが、この作品においてはシェイクスピア的な文体が適していると思いました。古風の言語が使われている事が伝わり、同時に原作のスタイルも「引用」出来る、と。成立させるために、シェイクスピアの作品を読み直し、その独特な構文を勉強しました。ですが、本当に難しかったのはこの部分ではありません。

A Midsummer's Okinawan Dream

A Midsummer's Okinawan Dream 真夏の夜の夢

この歌の終盤あたり、老人のキジムンが「ナニガナニシテナントヤラ」と歌います。さて、これは一体何を意味するのか?プロデューサーが、台本に丁寧な脚注を添えてくれました:「琉球国はその昔崩壊し、日本の属国となり、第二次世界大戦では激戦地となり、その後アメリカの統治下となり、今は日本に属している。という移り変わりの歴史を意味している。」ひゃ〜。

この「ナニガナニシテナントヤラ」に、プロデューサーが説明された意味を持たせるためには一体どのような英語字幕を書いたら良いのか?

先ず、この箇所は取りあえず飛ばし、それ以外の本編を翻訳していきました。そしてこの字幕に戻り、半日程検討してみました。色々と試行錯誤して、やっと辿り着いたのは、下記の字幕でした:

What tempest brought
By turbulent tides!

ここでは、島が外部からの力によって侵攻されてきた荒々しい歴史を、実際の歴史的事件を言及せずに想起させたいと考えました。それをイメージで、この際は島の沿岸に激しく打ちつけられる嵐の波というメタファーを使ってみたのです。更に、原文にもある頭韻を、ここでは「t」の頭韻で反映出来た事には満足しました。シェイクスピアの別の作品名(『テンペスト』)も引用することが出来ました。

今に至って、一枚の字幕にこれほど時間を費やした事は他にはありません。ですが結果として、貴重な教訓を教わりました。直訳的な翻訳では伝えられないものを、イメージなどを使ったクリエイティブな字幕で想起させる事が可能だということ。最近も、翻訳不可能と感じてしまうようなセリフにぶつかる時、この半日をかけた葛藤から学んだ教訓を思い出すようにしています。

 

Bookmark this on Hatena Bookmark
Hatena Bookmark - How to make “blah-blah-blah” mean something
Share on Facebook
Post to Google Buzz
Bookmark this on Yahoo Bookmark
Bookmark this on Livedoor Clip
Share on FriendFeed

Discussion

One Response to “How to make “blah-blah-blah” mean something”

  1. Oh wow. I could never have come up with those lines…Thanks so much for sharing this with us. Btw, this weekend, I got the chance to see “Abraxas” at the Zipangu Fest in London. Great subtitles!

    Posted by Mari Amano | November 22, 2011, 5:49 am

Post a Comment